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Special Olympics awareness on campus

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Special Olympics awareness on campus

Tiana Thompson, [email protected]

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Claire Waggoner is thankful for programs like the Special Olympics. Waggoner is a recent ULM graduate and Kappa Beta Gamma sorority (KBG) alumna. Her younger brother Cole has autism.

My Missing Piece, a fundraiser and awareness event, organized by KBG last Thursday held a special place on Waggoner’s life.

The event raised awareness for Special Olympics and special needs. KBG had puzzle pieces set up under the SUB overhang where students wrote encouraging messages on.

The sorority also accepted monetary donations that will directly benefit the Special Olympics.

“It [Special Olympics] gave Cole the opportunity to participate in things he wouldn’t normally get to do,” Waggoner said. 

“He got to be around others that are similar to him which is something he couldn’t really get at school, because his high school has a low special needs population,” Waggoner continued.

Riley Rolland, a member of KBG, said, “We just want to raise awareness for the Special Olympics and let people know that there’s nothing that’s going to hold them back.”

“I love working with the kids. Seeing their smile just makes me smile,” Rolland said.

The Special Olympics was founded by Eunice Kennedy Shriver in 1968.

According to their website, the organization gives opportunities to people with intellectual disabilities to develop physically, experience joy and make friendships. The Special Olympics works with many disabilities including Autism, Down Syndrome, Fragile X Syndrome, Cerebral Palsy and more.

Freshmen Cindy Mai knew little about Special Olympics before joining KBG. However, after having worked with the organization she shared that it opened her eyes to “something very amazing.”

Both Mai and Rolland shared that the events hosted during KBG’s philanthropy week this year was an amazing way to raise money for the Special Olympics and spread awareness about the non-profit.

Hollis Walker, the current  Kappa King, worked closely with the sorority during the philanthropy week.

“I’m so thankful for these girls and the opportunity they give me to have a chance to give back to my community,” said Walker, a kinesiology junior.

Visit the Special Olympics website to see how you can get involved with the Special Olympics.

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The Student News Site of University of Louisiana Monroe
Special Olympics awareness on campus