Is there an age limit for Halloween?

Gwendolyn Ducre

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Every year around this time kids, teenagers and even adults are preparing the perfect costume for Halloween.

Some students are anxious to pass out candy to the children while others are excited to dress up.

Halloween has been a tradition for kids to dress up as their favorite cartoon character and go door-to-door to collect candy.

But when are we too old to go trick-or-treating or dressing up? Is there an age limit?

Kelsey McGuire, a junior graphic design major, says she loves Halloween because it brings back good memories from her childhood.

McGuire participates in Halloween festivities every year.

This year, McGuire plans on dressing up as a classic witch.

McGuire feels everyone should practice their inner child and dress up for one day. She thinks there’s no harm in wearing a costume as an adult; as long as it’s age appropriate.

“To me it depends on the outfit, like age wise. If it’s an older person, maybe the older costumes. Cartoon costumes should be for the kids, and the classic costumes should be for the older people,” McGuire said.

There are a lot of costumes that are made for the more mature audience who want to be someone else for the day.

For women, there’s the infamous sexy cop, nurse or the Bride of Frankenstein costumes that you keep wanting to be every year.

For men, there’s always the famous Elvis costume, Michael Jackson or a hunky firefighter.

There’s no law-forbidding adults from dressing up for Halloween.

Tyler Manning, a senior English major, says he paints his face and dresses up like a zombie for every Halloween.

Manning says he dresses up simply because it’s fun.

“Once a year you get to dress crazy so why not,” Manning said.

However students like Kris Graham, a sophomore nursing major, feels people shouldn’t wear costumes at all.

Graham also does not wish to celebrate this holiday due to religious reasons.

“I don’t like Halloween because I don’t like when people wear costumes. I don’t think it symbolizes anything. If it’s ‘just for fun’ you can have fun doing anything else. We’re too old to be wearing costumes. Leave it for the kids,” Graham said.

Graham also says dressing up is a gender role.

Graham says the guys where he’s from do not wear costumes; it’s too girly.

Halloween, or All Hallows’ Eve, became an American holiday in the early 1900’s.

The Holiday orientated in Ireland then eventually led to the United States. Costumes were made popular by Americans.

Trick-or-treating, known to some as guising, can be a sketchy practice by definition.

Children go out and ask the question, “trick or treat?” The jist is that if the child doesn’t get a treat they may show a trick by rolling the person’s home.

Halloween was originally targeted to young children; especially after the baby boom.

According to History.com, America makes an annual $6 billion dollar gross from Halloween.

So now the question is, what will you be for Halloween?