Culturati Noiré cultivates the runway

Photo+by+Siddharth+Gaulee
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Culturati Noiré cultivates the runway

Photo by Siddharth Gaulee

Photo by Siddharth Gaulee

Photo by Siddharth Gaulee

Photo by Siddharth Gaulee

Sisam Shrestha

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Heritage is important.

And what better way to learn about your heritage than through a fashion show and spoken performances?

“Culturati Noiré” at Brown Gym this past weekend was all about cultural heritage, representation and unity showcased through various performances.

ULM alumnus Robert J. Brown, founder of DowUrk Inc. and owner of RJBrown Photography LLC organized his sixth event to “expose the background development of African-American heritage.”

Brown collaborated with his fraternity the Eta Chi chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Inc.

Models strutted down an elevated runway as music and colored lights blared through the foggy background. The highlight of the event was the “Black Heritage Fest” fashion show. There were a few local venders set around the gym and spoken word/instrumentals by local artists in between sets.

Among the stalls was “Something Saucy”, a business ran by 16-year-old Tamia Washington from Ouachita High School. All the candles and jewelry on display were hand made by Tamia herself.

Tammy Washington, Tamia’s mother, said Tamia was at the show to show her “passion for fashion.” “She’s walking in the fashion show. She’s using the term “saucy” for style and design. She’s just sharing her love,” Washington said.

Models with colorful outfits sashayed across the elevated ramp, each showcasing a part of the African- American heritage story. Lonesha Tyson, a freshman graphic design major, said that the performers were great, but her favorite part was the fashion show.

It was like watching a timeline of African-American history of the struggles and the accomplishments,” Tyson said.

According to Brown, another purpose of the fashion show was to “grant those who have aspirations to model or are into fashion an opportunity to be part of one.”

Brown had a mixed range of models: professional, amateurs, from ULM, nearby communities and even a few kids from local high schools.