ULM renovates Madison Hall

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ULM renovates Madison Hall

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On July 31, on ULM’s Facebook page, it was announced that the oldest housing option on campus, Madison Hall, was being renovated.

Junior pre-occupational therapist assistant major, Ethan Vincent, could not have been more excited about the news. Vincent had taken notice of the problems in his dorm but tried not to pay them much mind.
“The problems Madison had didn’t cause enough issue that it made Madison unlivable,” Vincent said. “They were just inconveniences.”

However, the issues proved to be hard to ignore after living in Madison Hall for four semesters.
According to Vincent, before renovations the paint on the walls and closet doors constantly chipped off which covered his dorm floor and the walls could be easily heard through.

Vincent’s largest complaint was the desk area. If Vincent and his roommate were working at their desk at the same time, they would bump elbows and get in each other’s way. Luckily for Vincent, the desk areas in Madison Hall dorms have been expanded allowing for more work space, according to ULM’s Facebook page. This semester, he will be able to complete his assignments without getting too close to his roommate.

Josiah Wagg, a junior accounting major, disagrees with Vincent. Madison Hall’s issues were not just inconveniences—they made living in the dorms unbearable. Wagg lived in Madison Hall last semester but will not be returning.
“The dorms in Madison Hall looked like a prison cell,” Wagg said. “They were these really drab, gray rooms with two small beds, a little desk and not much else.”

There were not many things Wagg enjoyed about Madison Hall, but his main issue with the dorms were the walls.
“You could always hear through the walls,” Wagg said. “You could even hear complete conversations sometimes if your room was quiet.”

Wagg was surprised he ever got quality rest while living in Madison Hall.
According to ULM’s Facebook page, the Madison Hall renovations include: closet and desk space replacements, new paint on the exterior and sound barrier additions.

Although Wagg no longer lives in Madison Hall and is unable to benefit from the renovations, he is glad the students still living there will have a better experience than him.
But as of now, Madison West has not undergone the same renovations as the rest of Madison Hall so not every student has experienced the upgrades.

Vincent, on the other hand, is ready to begin his fifth semester living in Madison Hall and at ULM due to the renovations that have been made.

“I believe I will better enjoy my time spent here, because of having a more comforting area to work in and a more comfortable living space,” Vincent said.
However, Wagg believes the renovations made to Madison Hall are just the beginning of a long process that needs to happen.

“Everyone’s room had their own unique problems that took extremely long to get fixed,” Wagg said. “There is more that can be done to Madison Hall.”

Tresea Buckhaults, director of Residential Life, was unavailable for comment as Residential Life prepared for Move In Mania.