Handprints for breast cancer awareness

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Handprints for breast cancer awareness

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For Fisher Binns, cancer has impacted him tremendously. Binns’ family friend died of cancer which impacted everyone in his family.
“We were really connected to her,” said Binns, a junior risk management major and member of the Kappa Sigma Fraternity.
The Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority and Kappa Sigma Fraternity brought the Susan G. Komen Fundraiser on campus to enlighten students, faculty and staff about breast cancer. The Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation is the largest and best-funded breast cancer organization in the U.S.
Students could go in front of the Quad to put their handprint, covered in pink paint, on one of the fraternities’ or sororities’ white letters with their name around it after donating $1 for breast cancer research. The fundraiser lasted from 11 a.m. to one p.m. Monday to Thursday.
According to PublicHealth, the most common cancer among women is breast cancer. Breast cancer is the fourth most common cancer in the world. Breast cancer can develop within a moment, so a monthly examination is necessary to find the cancer in time. Deneisha McClelland, an Alpha Kappa Alpha member, said that African Americans are prone to have the highest diagnosis of most types of cancers.
“People should always do breast examinations, especially African American women,” said McClelland, a senior nursing major.
The older a person gets, the rate and development of breast cancer increases. About one percent of men also have breast cancer, according to breastcancer.org. The fundraiser will help both men and women with cancer.
“I feel people should support because anyone can be affected by it, because women and men can both get breast cancer,” said Kina Manning, a senior political science major.
Even if you do not have breast cancer or know someone who has it, participating in this charity will help fight for a cure for breast cancer. Binns, McClelland and Manning all agreed that they are optimistic that a cure for breast cancer is possible in their lifetimes. Treatment for cancer patients will also be supported with the money donated.