Young voters have power, must use it

Sunil Bishwokarma

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Do you ever wish there was a way to change the amount of college debt that you acquired or the complicated routes you have to take to own your first house? Well, you’re in luck. There is a way. Vote on it.
Young voters aged 18-29 have lower voting turnouts than any other age group, according to United States Election Project.
However, young people are also becoming increasingly passionate about political issues.
They care about things like climate change, reproductive rights and gun laws. Politicians that the public votes into office vote on issues like funding for grants for college students and health insurance costs, which are issues associated with young people. So if young people did vote, they could make a real difference.
According to the New York Times, there are a number of reasons why young people don’t show up to the polls. Some think that their vote won’t make a difference. Some find the process of registering too complicated. Young people move around a lot and many go to out-of-state colleges which makes voting a big obstacle that is difficult to overcome.
But young people need to vote more and vote for candidates whose priorities line up with theirs. That way, they would be able to accomplish more of what they want rather than sitting back and watching the older voters get what they want all the time.
Each generation grows up in a different type of society; therefore, younger generations want different things than older generations. Just because their grandparents and parents believed that certain people should be in office does not mean that they feel the same way.
Furthermore, the fact that young people don’t vote much means that politicians ignore them when making political decisions that specifically affect them. Instead, they listen to what older people want. Because they actually vote.
Whether it’s complicated to vote or not, young people have got to do it.
It’s already hard trying to navigate through life when you are freshly out of your parent’s house, because of the things you still don’t know. Why not make life easier by voting for who and what you believe in?
Ultimately, young people have the ability to determine the future. It’s just a matter of stepping up to the ballot box and actually doing it.