What you need to know about Louisiana’s ballot

What+you+need+to+know+about+Louisiana%E2%80%99s+ballot

Sunil Bishwokarma

Savannah Jones sat outside the SUB last week asking passersby, “Did you know we’re voting on more than just president?”

As a member of College Democrats, Jones wanted to share information about what we’ll be voting on this Election Day.

Spots for the U.S. Senate, U.S. Representatives and local officials will be on the ballot. And for Louisianans, seven new proposals to the our constitution are going to be on the ballot.

Amendment 1 is about the right to abortion and funding for abortion.

Amendment 2 presents the issue of  whether or not the presence or production of oil or gas should be taken into account when determining the fair market value of an oil or gas well.

Amendment 3, if voted through, would permit the use of the state’s Budget Stabilization Fund for costs associated with a disaster declared by the federal government.

Amendment 4 will ask whether ot not you support  limiting the growth of the expenditure limit for the state’s general and dedicated funds. It will also ask if you support removal of the calculation of its growth factor from the constitution.

Amendment 5 is about local governments and their ability to enter into cooperative endeavor agreements with new or expanding manufacturing establishments and allowing the manufacturing establishments to make payments to the taxing authority instead of paying property taxes.

Amendment 6 will ask voters to support or oppose an increase in the maximum amount of income a person can receive and still qualify for the homestead exemption, which shields homeowners from creditors when a spouse dies or they declare bankruptcy.

Amendment 7, if passed, would allow the creation of the Louisiana Unclaimed Property Permanent Trust Fund, which would preserve the money that remains unclaimed by its owner or owners.

Campus organizations like College Democrats and Feminists in Action are trying to get the word out about the information that will be presented to voters come Nov. 3.

Whitney Kwentoh, president of Feminists in Action, said that voting is important because, “While it won’t fix the systemic problems we face, voting can give us a chance to have our voices heard especially on a local level.”